Feeling lost

Feeling lost

 

I’m feeling very ‘lost’ at the moment. It’s hard to be precise about the feeling, but those from the UK might have heard the word ‘discombobulated’ and I think that’s a good fit for me!

It doesn’t help that I’ve had a cold for 5 weeks (my first one in over 4 years) and whilst it’s on its way out, I still get bouts of coughing and headaches or earaches which pull me down.

But there is something deeper – a deeper pull for real and meaningful connection with the Earth, with the Source. I can’t get motivated by work, in fact, jobs that should be taking a few hours are taking days – suddenly work doesn’t seem important.

A number of the books I’ve read recently, or am reading right now have touched on this and made me realise that I am missing something.

Maybe this phase will pass.

Maybe this is a wakeup call.

How civilisation terrorises the Earth

How civilisation terrorises the Earth

Mark Boyle is a permaculturalist, an activist and a writer (amongst many other things). One of his most notable achievements was living for 3 years without money (ie he personally had no cash, savings or bank cards), the result of which was a book ‘The Moneyless Man’.

 

So what led Mark to do this radical act? After his business degree, he moved from Ireland to the UK and worked with an organic food company. During this time he came to realise that “money creates a kind of disconnection between us and our actions”, which in turn led him into his experiment in living without money.

Once the press got hold of his story, there were many who criticised him for the fact that although he personally had no money, people were giving him stuff that initially had to be bought and earned. Those people significantly miss the point about what Boyle was trying to achieve, which is less about not having money and more about understanding and being responsble for it’s connections.

Anyway, I digress slightly. I just wanted to give you a bit of background on him in case you didn’t know who he was…

Today, Mark posted the following on his Facebook page (he’s now returned to Ireland, and although not moneyless any more, he used royalties from book sales etc to set up a ‘freeconomy’ which includes a free pub!

Amidst our anger about the brutality and violence of ISIS, we seem to forget that to the millions of other species on Earth, Industrial Civilisation must feel like ISIS on steroids.

I don’t say this to be dramatic or controversial, or to in any way make light of the horrors inflicted by ISIS (and the US, UK, French governments etc.), but simply to help us retain some perspective about the way of life we seem so eager to want to protect.

Some animals we cage so tightly they can barely move — billions never breathe fresh air or see natural daylight before they’re slaughtered. Our precious way of life drives tens of thousands of wild, free creatures into extinction every year. Through our ecologically-idiotic agricultural practices we make deserts and monocultures out of once fertile soils and diverse landscapes, killing the uncountable life-forms that once lived within them. We’ve bottom-trawled the oceans to the point where marine populations are outright collapsing, and ecological systems with it. To forests and rainforests, we are butchers who know no limit to our violence. From the perspective of the rest of the community of Life, ISIS are pussycats in comparison.

Somehow we cannot seem to see this. We never see our own violence and brutality, only that of other people, and only when it is done to things that lie within our parameters for moral consideration. Because our civilised world is so manicured, hiding the systemic hyper-violence it depends on behind closed doors, we think we live peaceful, nonviolent lives. But we don’t. We need to start being honest about this.

And he’s right. ‘We’ can’t seem to see what we are doing to the Earth and all her inhabitants, whether they be animals, trees or simply the land itself. This is the land that provides us with everything we should need, but not everything we greed.

Every day, we bring ourselves closer and closer to that tipping point (some say we are already there) from which it becomes impossible to rescue the situation for humans. The Earth will survive beyond humanity, but along the way, we create so much suffering.

[Image credit: Wikipedia]

Mark’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mark.boyle3?fref=ts

The first frost

The first frost

Winter is late this year.

We’ve been told that this year has been the warmest on record and certainly this autumn has been unseasonably mild. But since Friday, the temperatures here in the UK have dropped dramatically and this morning was the first ‘proper’ frost of the season.

frost

I have childhood memories of going to see the local bonfire and firework display on November 5th, and remembering how cold it was, but Nov 5th this year was incredibly mild, if a little wet.

But now the winter is here and that’s good. It’s good to notice the changing of the seasons, to feel the wheel of the year turn as we fall a little faster towards the winter solstice.

And from the solstice, the shortest day, we start to see the days getting longer and growth will return, although it’ll be a few months before things warm up!

Walking in the woods and spoon carving

Today, we went for a walk in some local woods. It was intentional as part of my personal re-wilding to experience something more ‘natural’ and yet fairly close to home. We arrived later afternoon, which was perfect as there were only a few people around.

The woods are managed by Warwickshire Wildlife Trust, so perhaps it’s not really ‘wild’, but it’s the closest I can get within a few minutes of home.

On the woodland floor, I found a branch which I hope could be carved into a spoon. I brought it home and managed to split the branch along it’s length and after some examination, was able to work out the best way a spoon would fit.

I don’t know when I’ll get the time to finish it, but I’m eager to progress this as one of my ambitions is to carve a spoon from green wood…

Now

now_blog_photo

Yesterday has happened. You can’t change what happened, or what you did yesterday.

Tomorrow hasn’t happened yet. Who knows what will happen before then or what might happen – you don’t know, so don’t fret.

Now, right now, is the only time that matters. Once the moment has gone, it’s gone. Do what matters to you, and do it now. Now is the only thing you have control over.

I’ve been attending ‘mindfulness’ classes for some time. At first, it all seemed like simplistic stuff, but one of the things with any learning is that old (bad) habits die hard. The secret to change is repetition and a good support group around you.

I’m not suggesting Mindfulness will solve all your problems because it won’t, but it will give you a better view on things and a better attitude to life. I know I have a long way to go, but I have started. Have you?

Live in the moment, but respect all life, respect mother Earth.